Coffee Farmers Find Local Market More Lucrative

A worker harvests arabica coffee cherries at a plantation near Pangalengan, West Java. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside)

By : REUTERS | on 3:09 PM June 23, 2018
Category : Eyewitness, Multimedia, Photos

Jakarta. Long being at the bottom of international coffee trade chain, Indonesian farmers are now find more lucrative market that pays better for their yields.

Growing coffee demand from young Indonesians, who prefer taking up Westerners coffee drinking habit to their parent generation's tea, has sparked hundreds of independent cafes and roasters to open shop across the archipelago.

Close proximity to farmers allowed them to pay higher prices than the overseas buyers, while selling directly to consumers at better profit margins.

Wildan Mustofa, an arabica coffee farmer with a mill in Pangalengan, West Java, said his domestic sales are rising fast.

"The local purchases grow by almost 100 percent every year," said Wildan, while helping workers spread out coffee cherries to be dried under the sun.

Reuters

Freshly harvested arabica coffee cherries are seen in a bucket at a plantation near Pangalengan, West Java. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside) Freshly harvested arabica coffee cherries are seen in a bucket at a plantation near Pangalengan, West Java. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside)

A worker harvests arabica coffee cherries. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside) A worker harvests arabica coffee cherries. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside)

Workers cover drying arabica coffee beans before it rains at a coffee mill in Pangalengan. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside) Workers cover drying arabica coffee beans before it rains at a coffee mill in Pangalengan. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside)

 

Arabica green coffee beans. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside) Arabica green coffee beans. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside)

Workers sort arabica green coffee beans. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside) Workers sort arabica green coffee beans. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside)

Workers dry arabica coffee cherries. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside) Workers dry arabica coffee cherries. (Reuters Photo/Darren Whiteside)

 

Widya Pratama, the owner of Kopi Aroma, roasts locally grown coffee beans with a traditional wood heated roaster in Bandung, West Java. (Reuters Photo/Willy Kurniawan) Widya Pratama, the owner of Kopi Aroma, roasts locally grown coffee beans with a traditional wood heated roaster in Bandung, West Java. (Reuters Photo/Willy Kurniawan)

A roaster prepares to roast locally grown coffee beans at Jack Runner Roastery coffee shop in Bandung. (Reuters Photo/Willy Kurniawan) A roaster prepares to roast locally grown coffee beans at Jack Runner Roastery coffee shop in Bandung. (Reuters Photo/Willy Kurniawan)

A barista brews locally gown coffee at Jack Runner Roastery and cafe. (Reuters Photo/Willy Kurniawan) A barista brews locally gown coffee at Jack Runner Roastery and cafe. (Reuters Photo/Willy Kurniawan)

 


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