Where Old Bajaj Rust Away

An old bajaj sleeps the eternal sleep in Gang Makmur, West Jakarta. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

By : Yudha Baskoro | on 4:58 PM April 25, 2018
Category : Eyewitness, Multimedia, Photos

Jakarta. Motorized three-wheeled rickshaws, known as bajaj after the name of their Indian producer, have been the hallmark of Jakarta's public transportation.

Introduced during the tenure of Governor Ali Sadikin in the late 1960s, these famously orange vehicles were replaced with newer, blue models in 2006. 

For many old bajaj the road ended in Gang Makmur, West Jakarta, where they joined the rusting shells of their fellows abandoned much earlier. Their noisy spluttering is no longer heard. Covered by ivy, they stand in line, queuing to rust away and enter the land of eternal combustion.

Blue bajaj replaced the old orange ones in 2006. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Blue bajaj replaced the old orange ones in 2006. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Lines of rusting three-wheelers fill the Gang Makmur neighborhood in West Jakarta. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Lines of rusting three-wheelers fill the Gang Makmur neighborhood in West Jakarta. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

The shells of Jakarta's old bajaj disappear among weeds and ivy. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) The shells of Jakarta's old bajaj disappear among weeds and ivy. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Many of the orange bajaj had served Jakarta for more than four decades. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Many of the orange bajaj had served Jakarta for more than four decades. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Old three-wheelers end their road in Gang Makmur, where they are left to dissolve away into rust. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Old three-wheelers end their road in Gang Makmur, where they are left to dissolve away into rust. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)


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