Waste Not, Want Not

A worker is covered in black soldier flies at Biomagg's facility in Depok, West Java, on Jan. 25. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

By : JG | on 9:04 PM February 09, 2018
Category : Eyewitness, Multimedia, Photos

Indonesia faces a massive waste management problem, with nearly 60 percent of all garbage produced being organic in nature. In addition, the archipelago is the world's second-largest food waster after Saudi Arabia, throwing away nearly 300 kilograms of food per person each year, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit..

However, a local startup has found a sustainable solution to the problem by using biotechnology to turn this garbage into valuable commodities.

Following observations and research on black soldier flies (Hermetia illucens), Biomagg founder and chief executive Aminudi, 27, discovered that their larvae can break down food waste faster and turn it into compost, while producing fewer odors. In addition, the larvae are a good source of protein for use in animal feed.

Biomagg, established in 2015, opted for the black soldier flies because they do not spread disease and have a short life cycle.

The company, based in Depok, West Java, currently has three waste management centers, with one of them located near Taman Mini Indonesia Indah in East Jakarta and another at Pamulang in South Tangerang, Banten.

 

Biomagg chief executive Aminudi, left, and his colleagues sort through organic waste at the company's facilities in Depok on Jan. 25. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Biomagg chief executive Aminudi, left, and his colleagues sort through organic waste at the company's facilities in Depok on Jan. 25. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

 

The black soldier fly larvae are used to decompose organic waste and turn it into compost, while the larvae are used as animal feed. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) The black soldier fly larvae are used to decompose organic waste and turn it into compost, while the larvae are used as animal feed. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

 

Black soldier flies were chosen because they do not spread disease and have a short life cycle. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Black soldier flies were chosen because they do not spread disease and have a short life cycle. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

 

 

 

Aminudi checks on the condition of young flies at an incubator in Depok. The mature flies lay their eggs, from which larvae, or maggots emerge to consume the garbage and turn it into compost within two weeks. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Aminudi checks on the condition of young flies at an incubator in Depok. The mature flies lay their eggs, from which larvae, or maggots emerge to consume the garbage and turn it into compost within two weeks. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

 

Larvae with the remains of organic waste. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Larvae with the remains of organic waste. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

 

Organic waste being prepared for exposure to the larvae. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Organic waste being prepared for exposure to the larvae. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

 

Aminudi processes organic waste to attain an even consistency. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Aminudi processes organic waste to attain an even consistency. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

 

Nearly 30 percent of all food produced in Indonesia is discarded. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro) Nearly 30 percent of all food produced in Indonesia is discarded. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

 


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