Indonesian Govt Mulls Lower Motorcycle Speed Limit i

The victim was riding on Sunday night when he came under attack. (Reuters Photo/Beawiharta)

By : Dion Bisara | on 7:18 PM May 22, 2014
Category : News

Women workers ride motorcycles in front of their shoes factory as they return home, in Tangerang, Banten province, on March 7, 2014. (Reuters Photo/Beawiharta) Women workers ride motorcycles in front of their shoes factory as they return home, in Tangerang, Banten province, on March 7, 2014. (Reuters Photo/Beawiharta)

Leipzig. The government is mulling a plan to limit motorcycle speeds in Indonesia aimed at reducing accidents, according to a senior government official.

Deputy Transport Minister Bambang Susantono said the ministry was planning to commission a study by the end of this year to see whether it was feasible to cap motorcycle speeds.

Authorities currently impose speed limits based on the types of road, instead of vehicle types. The speed limit on toll roads is 100 kilometer per hours, while it is 80 kph on inter-city roads, 50 kph on city streets, and 30 kph in settlement areas.

“Motorcyclist fatalities are among our top concerns,” Bambang told the Jakarta Globe on Wednesday. “We are working with other countries to learn about methods that can reduce accidents, and one of those is to reduce the speed limit.”

The transportation ministry will carry out the study in cooperation with the International Motorcycle Manufacturers Association (IMMA), Bambang said following a meeting at the International Transport Forum Summit 2014 in Leipzig, Germany.

Motorists accounted for 64 percent of the more than 100,000 road accidents last year, down from 70 percent in 2012, according to data from the National Police.

With more than 80 million motorcycles on Indonesian roads, accident numbers may not significantly drop anytime soon.

The Road Safety Annual Report 2014 — which is published by the International Traffic Safety Data and Analysis Group, an ITF working group — showed that motorcyclists are among the most vulnerable road users in developed countries.

Fatalities among motorcyclists were only reduced by 17 percent between 2000 and 2012, compared to a 50 percent decrease among car occupants, the report showed.

But Gunadi Sindhuwinata, chairman of the Indonesian Motorcycle Producer’s Association (AISI), who attended the summit, was not convinced with the plan.

Gunadi said the high number of fatalities among Indonesian motorists stemmed from a lack of compliance with safety rules.

“And to make it worse, authorities seem to tolerate this. Over time, it turns into a habit,” Gunadi said.

The Jakarta Globe was invited to the 2014 summit by the International Transport Forum

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