Jakarta Can Save $22m in Waste Expenses in New Rule i

Scavengers collect recyclable plastic at Bantar Gebang garbage dump in Bekasi, West Java province, Indonesia, on March 29, 2013. (EPA Photo/Mast Irham)

By : Lenny Tristia Tambun | on 11:14 AM June 02, 2013
Category : News, Jakarta, Featured

Scavengers collect recyclable plastic at Bantar Gebang garbage dump in Bekasi, West Java province, Indonesia, on March 29, 2013. (EPA Photo/Mast Irham) Scavengers collect recyclable plastic at Bantar Gebang garbage dump in Bekasi, West Java province, Indonesia, on March 29, 2013. (EPA Photo/Mast Irham)

The Jakarta administration could save up to Rp 217 billion ($22 million) in sanitation expenses under the city’s newly enacted waste management regulation, an expert said on Saturday.

“If the new regulation can be implemented, what will happen next is cost savings from transporting waste, which has been a burden on the Jakarta coffer each year,” said Sodiq Suhardianto, chairman of the Indonesian Sanitation Study Center (P3I).

The new regulation, approved by the Jakarta Legislative Council last month, mandates that industrial and commercial areas as well as upscale housing complexes be able to independently manage their own waste, taking the burden off the city’s integrated waste dumps (TPST) and final dump sites (TPA), which have been overwhelmed by trash.

“The management of commercial areas [in Jakarta] will have to collect, transport and manage their own wastes or work together with a sanitation firm. This system has already been implemented in a number of developed countries,” Sodiq said.

The rule states that those responsible for the management of residential, commercial, industrial and other special areas, who have been found negligent in providing facilities for waste management, will face administrative sanctions and fines of between Rp 10 million to Rp 50 million.

The P3I chairman said the requirement provides an opportunity for the Jakarta administration to establish a city-owned commercial waste management firm to raise money needed to cover waste management expenses in less developed areas.

“Implement [the regulation] properly, then the city government can save up to 30 percent or even more,” he said.

Every year, the capital spends around Rp 400 billion for transporting waste and another Rp 255 billion to manage the waste, Sodiq said.

The new regulation is also aimed at reducing waste that is non-biodegradable.

Manufacturers that fail to display matters related to reducing waste or waste handling on their packaging, or use packaging that cannot naturally decompose, may face administrative sanctions as well as fines of Rp 25 million to Rp 50 million.

Shopping center operators who do not use environmentally friendly shopping bags will also face administrative sanctions as well as fines of between Rp 5 million and Rp 25 million.

Last week, Unu Nurdin, the head of the Jakarta Sanitation Office said that the regulation also imposes heftier fines on littering and illegal dumping and for the first time obliges households and building operators to separate their organic waste from inorganic.

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