Survey: House of Representatives the Nation's Most Corrupt

Many Indonesians have little faith in their representatives, surveys continue to find. (Antara Photo/Sigid Kurniawan)

By : Yustinus Paat | on 9:10 PM December 09, 2015
Category : News, Featured, Corruption

Jakarta. The House of Representatives is considered Indonesia's most corrupt government body, while the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) is seen as the country's most credible agency, a survey conducted online by Change.org and the Public Virtue Institute revealed on Wednesday.

At least 40,000 netizens were randomly selected from Change.org's membership database to take part in the survey.

Over 94 percent of the respondents said corruption is Indonesia's main problem, while only 0.28 percent said it was not an issue.

Almost half of the respondents chose the House as the most corrupt government body in Indonesia, followed by the Regional Representatives Council (DPRD) with 14 percent and local government leaders with 10 percent.

The KPK is still seen as an honest enforcement body. On a scale of 1-10, the anti graft body scored 7.7, while the Attorney General's Office only got a 4.9 and the police scored a mere 4.2.

"Corruption has been the main issue since we started Change.org in 2012," said Arief Aziz, Change.org's campaign director. "The survey was made to get an overview of netizens' perspectives and to seek solutions for corruption issues."

Respondents were also concerned about attempts to target anti-corruption activists, for instance with legislation that can be used against whistle-blowers.

Over 75 percent of the respondents said they were afraid of facing legal steps if they would report or criticize officials and companies involved in corruption. Some 62 percent of respondents feared physical intimidation and one in five were afraid of being intimidated online.

Respondents also said that heavier sentences were needed to help eradicate corruption in Indonesia.

Indonesian lawmakers have long been facing criticism for their performance, leading a structural lack of trust in the institution.

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