Australian Minister in Jakarta to Convey New Home Affairs Portfolio

Chief Security Minister Wiranto met with Australian Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, who conveyed his ministry's portfolio in Jakarta on Monday (05/03). (Photo courtesy of the Embassy of Australia in Indonesia)

By : Sheany | on 2:09 PM March 05, 2018
Category : News, Politics, Featured, Terrorism, Foreign Affairs, Security

Jakarta. Chief Security Minister Wiranto met with Australian Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, who conveyed his ministry's portfolio in Jakarta on Monday (05/03).

The two ministers also discussed Indonesia-Australia relations on security, immigration, law and anti-terrorism efforts.

"He [Dutton] explained the new portfolio, and I also conveyed what’s been achieved in Indonesia-Australia relations, especially regarding our good cooperation in countering terrorism and terrorism financing, as well as other successes in regional security issues," Wiranto said.

With the new changes, the authority of Australia’s attorney-general has been diverted to the country’s Department of Home Affairs, Wiranto explained.

He added that their meeting also covered discussions on Indonesia’s domestic politics, touching on the political climate ahead of the simultaneous regional elections in June and the 2019 general elections.

"I explained that increased tensions in the political climate occur during every election, but it’s still under control," Wiranto said.

Dutton also held a meeting with President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo, and is set to meet with other members of the Indonesian government as part of his visit to the country.

In July 2017, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced plans to establish a new home affairs portfolio that would serve as a central department to provide strategic planning, coordination and support.

The plans aim to bring together Australia’s immigration, border protection, law enforcement and domestic security agencies.

This includes the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC), the Australian Federal Police (AFP) and the Australian Border Force (ABF).

In a statement, the Turnbull government said that the move is a response to "an increasingly complex security environment, evolving threats from terrorism and organized crime, and the development of new and merging technologies, including encryption."

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