Indonesian Doctors Association (IDI) said physicians should not perform chemical castration—the additional punishment the government is seeking for child sex offenders—arguing the procedure violates medical ethics. (Antara Photo/Risky Andrianto)

Doctors Refuse to Perform Chemical Castration on Sex Offenders

BY :ALIN ALMANAR

JUNE 10, 2016

Jakarta. Indonesian Doctors Association (IDI) has said that physicians should not be involved in performing chemical castration—the additional punishment the government is seeking for child sex offenders—arguing that the procedure violates medical ethics.

A new bill—soon be deliberated at the House of Representatives—to revise the 2002 Child Protection Law allows injecting male sex offenders with synthetic female hormones to suppress their sex drives.

Performing this procedure violates a 2016 edict by the Medical Ethics and Honors Council, which is based on the code of medical ethics as well as the Hippocratic Oath, IDI said.

"Don't involve doctors as executors of the additional punishment," IDI chairman Ilham Oetama Marsis said in a statement released on Thursday (09/06).

The government said doctors performing chemical castration will not violate medical ethics as the procedure is performed by order of the court, and is defending the additional punishment.

According to the government, chemical castration would deter would-be sex offenders and thus reduce the prevalence of sexual crimes.

The new bill also proposes life imprisonment or the death penalty for pedophiles, serial rapists and those convicted of gang rape.

"Based on scientific evidence, chemical castration does not suppress perpetrators' desire for sexual violence," Ilham said. "We propose that the government find other forms of additional punishment."

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