Members of various city planning councils in Indonesia spoke during a seminar held at the Indonesia Climate Change Education Forum and Expo 2016 at the Jakarta Convention Center in Senayan on Thursday (14/04). (Antara Photo/Rosa Panggabean)

City Planners Meet in Jakarta to Discuss Climate Change

BY :RATRI M. SINIWI

APRIL 14, 2016

Jakarta. Members of various city planning councils in Indonesia spoke during a seminar held at the Indonesia Climate Change Education Forum and Expo 2016 at the Jakarta Convention Center in Senayan on Thursday (14/04).

The seminar, which focuses on making cities more environmentally friendly, with low carbon emissions, climate resilience, and sustainable communities, was organized by the Presidential Working Unit for Climate Change Control (UKP-PPI).

The four-day forum is held in response to the Paris Agreement by the 2015 Paris Climate Conference, as Indonesia is one of the 195 representative countries that aim to mitigate greenhouse-gas emissions.

"With rising urbanization in Indonesian cities, we need to keep working towards cities with low carbon emissions, and it needs a collaborative effort from all of us, not just the government," said Rachmat Witoelar, President Joko Widodo's special envoy on climate change.

The former state minister of environment said most greenhouse-gas emissions in Indonesian cities emanate from transportation activities, energy consumption in buildings and homes, and from waste.

Bogor Mayor Bima Arya, who was also one of the keynote speakers during the seminar, noted that the most important aspect in building a low-carbon city was urban planning and zoning.

"It's important to involve communities, and the most challenging part is building a culture and an attitude for people to work together in creating a green city," Bima said in a statement.

The seminar is one of several that will be conducted at the Indonesia Climate Change Education Forum and Expo 2016, which started on Thursday and ends on Sunday.

The Indonesian government has set an ambitious target to cut carbon emissions in the archipelago by 29 percent by 2030. International pressure has increased on Indonesia last year when some palm-oil companies burned down forests to open new areas for plantations.

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