Government agencies are well prepared to combat global cyberattacks, including the recent Petya ransomware attack on systems across the world, a minister said on Friday (30/06). (JG Photo/Tabita Diela)

Gov't Agencies Are Prepared for Any Cyberattack: Minister

BY :TABITA DIELA, DAMES ALEXANDER SINAGA

JUNE 30, 2017

Jakarta. Government agencies are well prepared to combat global cyberattacks, including the recent Petya ransomware attack on systems across the world, a minister said on Friday (30/06).

"I've contacted ministries and stakeholders, especially in critical infrastructure sectors such as transport, financial and energy," Communications and Information Minister Rudiantara told reporters at a press conference.

Rudiantara's comments come after more than 12,500 machines in Ukraine were infected by the so-called Petya ransomware, which has since infected machines in 64 countries, including in Belgium, Brazil, Germany, Russia and the United States.

"So far, there is no report of any such attack [in Indonesia], but I've heard some ministries have gone back to work just to back up the data," the minister said.

Most companies and government agencies, however, have given employees a weeklong holiday to celebrate Idul Fitri, raising concerns that the virus may be laying dormant until officials show up to work on Monday.

"But at least I want to make the agencies aware of such a threat and to be prepared," Rudiantara said.

The task-force Indonesia Security Incidents Response Team on internet Infrastructure (ID-Sirtii) sent warnings to government agencies regarding the threat of ransomware attacks on local systems, said Bisyron Wahyudi, an official of Sirtii.

According to Bisyron, most ministries and government agencies — including state-run airport operator Angkasa Pura and Airnav — have responded to ID-Sirtii's warning. The Directorate General of Taxes has also beefed up security in light of Sirtii's warnings.

Iwan Djuniardi, information technology director under the Directorate General of Taxes, said the agency has been prepared for similar threats since 2015 as part of a requirement to comply with global taxation standard automatic exchange of information.

"We've done what Sirtii suggested and the treatment is similar to the previous ransomware threat, WannaCry," Iwan told the Jakarta Globe separately.

Iwan, however, said the easiest way for viruses to spread is by human error.

"If people are unaware and keep opening suspicious emails, the security system will fail, regardless of how good it is," he said.

The tax office hosts a cybersecurity seminar for its employees twice a year.

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