A fisherman carries a yellowfin tuna on his shoulder in Waepure, Maluku Province on October 28, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Fair and Sustainable Fisheries For Better Future

BY :YUDHA BASKORO

NOVEMBER 21, 2021

November 21 marks the National Fish Day or Harkanans.  

First established in 2014, Harkanans has now entered its seventh year. 

It has become a time for the nation to reflect on its maritime wealth and fishery potential, which has yet to be fully optimized. But optimizing Indonesia’s vast potential of its fisheries must start from the upstream and into the downstream.

Sustainable seafood standards group the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) recently invited Jakarta Globe photojournalist Yudha Baskoro to visit Waepure Village, Air Buaya District, Buru Regency, Maluku Province. 

During the visit, the Globe had the opportunity to take a closer look at the ecolabel certification by the London-based NGO, which seeks to improve the fishermen’s welfare, while also championing fair and sustainable fisheries.

Since 2019, MSC has helped to connect fishermen, suppliers, buyers and decision makers. 

The MSC ecolabel allows the yellowfin tuna caught by the Waepure’s fishermen to be exported by Harta Samudra — the only tuna-processing factory and exporter in Buru Island.

Buying the yellowfin tuna is the seafood supplier Anova Food through its main partner Coral Triangle Processors. The latter is a fair trade-certified tuna processing company in America.

“With the certification from MSC, we [Harta Samudra] have learned a lot. From an economic point of view, profit must be sustainable. For companies, if they are profitable, they must be responsible. So the sea must be maintained so that there are still plenty of fish,” Harta Samudra’s director Robert Djuanda said.

As the head of a tuna exporting company, he considers that sustainable fisheries are the same as sustainable profits.

The MSC has also teamed up with the Maluku Provincial Marine and Fisheries Department — under the leadership of Dr. Abdul Haris, S.Pi, M.Si— on sustainable fisheries programs in the province.

In practice, the government will provide assistance to yellowfin tuna fishermen and hold regular meetings twice a year. This is part of the government’s commitment with its partners to support small-scale fisheries.

“The fishermen have always to be accompanied and evaluated, so they do not get into trouble in the field. One minor problem can prompt them to carry out dangerous practices that can harm the environment. For instance, going fishing on illegal boats,” Abdul Harris said in an interview at his office earlier this month.

MSC’s certification program has helped improve the tuna catch data. 

Every data now gets recorded in the iFish application which was first initiated by the Masyarakat dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI). This data is available for use by academics and stakeholders.

The MSC certification recognizes that a fishery has passed various international standard feasibility tests. Getting MSC’s nod of approval also proves that the Indonesian capture fisheries sector is able to compete with the highest standards in the global market for sustainable fisheries.

The program brings ample positive benefits to the Maluku and Indonesia’s tuna fisheries. Among others is a managed consumer price index, clear traceability, and qualified to be consumed.

With this certification program, the MSC indirectly contributes to optimizing Indonesian fisheries' potential by maintaining the fish quality from the sea and into the table.

 

A fisherman wife carries a squid bait at at Waepure, Buru Islands, Maluku Province on October 28, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A fisherman wife holds a bunch of squids in Waepure, Buru Islands, Maluku Province on October 28, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Umar Papalia, 42, catches a yellowfin tuna at Seram Sea, Maluku Province on October 30, 2021. He is a recipient of ecolabel fisherman sertificate from Marine Stewardship Council. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Umar Papalia, 42, catches a yellowfin tuna at Seram Sea, Maluku Province on October 30, 2021.​​​​​ He receives ecolabel fisherman sertificate from the Marine Stewardship Council. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A Masyakarat dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI) personnel collects data from a fisherman to be inputed in the iFish application at Waepure, Buru Islands, Maluku Province on October 28, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A Masyakarat dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI) personnel collects data from a fisherman to be inputed in the iFish application at Waepure, Buru Islands, Maluku Province on October 28, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Masyakarat dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI) personnel collects data from a fisherman to be inputed in iFish application at Waepure, Buru Islands, Maluku Province on October 28, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A Masyakarat dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI) personnel collects data from a fisherman to be inputed in the iFish application at Waepure, Buru Islands, Maluku Province on October 28, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
PT. Harta Samudra, a yellowfin tuna exporter in Maluku Islands, who sold a tuna with ecolabel certificate from Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) on a worldwide market. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Harta Samudra, a yellowfin tuna exporter in Maluku Islands, who sells the MSC-certified tuna to the global market. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A worker puts a yellowfin tuna with ecolabel from Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) inside a freezing room at PT. Harta Samudra, in Ambon, Maluku Province on October 29, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A worker puts a MSC-certified tuna inside a cold room at Harta Samudra, in Ambon, Maluku Province on October 29, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A worker carries a box of MSC ecolabel product inside a freezing room at PT. Harta Samudra, in Ambon, Maluku Province on October 29, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A worker carries a box of MSC-ecolabeled products inside the cold room at Harta Samudra, in Ambon, Maluku Province on October 29, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A car carries boxes of fish is seen outside PT. Harta Samudra, in Ambon, Maluku Province on November 2, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A car carrying boxes of fish is seen outside PT. Harta Samudra, in Ambon, Maluku Province on November 2, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Dishes with tuna recipes is seen at PT. Harta Samudra, in Ambon, Maluku Province on October 31, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Dishes with tuna recipes is seen at Harta Samudra, in Ambon, Maluku Province on October 31, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Umar Papalia, poses for the Jakarta Globe at Waepure beach in Buru Islands, Maluku Province on October 29, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Umar Papalia poses for the Jakarta Globe at Waepure beach in Buru Islands, Maluku Province on October 29, 2021.
He has received the ecolabel fisherman sertificate from the MSC. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Robert Djuanda, Director of PT. Harta Samudra poses for the Jakarta Globe at his office in Ambon, Maluku Province on November 2, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Harta Samudra director Robert Djuanda poses for the Jakarta Globe at his office in Ambon, Maluku Province on November 2, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Dr. Abdul Haris, S.Pi, M.Si, a Chief of Maluku Province Marine and Fisheries Department poses for the Jakarta Globe at his office in Ambon, Maluku Province on November 1, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Dr. Abdul Haris, S.Pi, M.Si, a Chief of Maluku Province Marine and Fisheries Department poses for the Jakarta Globe at his office in Ambon, Maluku Province on November 1, 2021. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

 

 

 

 

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