A Javan slow loris observes its surroundings after its release in the Tampomas conservation forest in Sumedang, West Java, on Jan. 20, 2019. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Turning Over a New Leaf

BY : YUDHA BASKORO

JANUARY 30, 2019

International Animal Rescue, an animal welfare nonprofit organization based in the United Kingdom, released 34 Javan slow lorises (Nycticebus javanicus) back into the wild in the Tampomas conservation forest in Sumedang, West Java, on Jan. 20 following their rescue from illegal traders earlier this month. 

Police in nearby Majalengka initially confiscated 69 of the nocturnal primates native to Central and West Java, but three did not survive due to poor health.

The population of Javan slow lorises is in sharp decline due to poaching. The animals are prized by locals who believe they possess magical and curative properties, but most are sold as exotic pets. 

The Javan slow loris is listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The species is also protected under Indonesian law.

A caretaker feeds one of the Javan slow lorises prior to release in the Tampomas conservation forest on Jan. 19. The animals eat fruit, seeds, tree gum, lizards and eggs. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A caretaker feeds a Javan slow loris prior to its release in the Tampomas conservation forest on Jan. 19. The animals are omnivores and their diet consists of fruits, seeds, tree gum, lizards, worms and eggs. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Javan slow lorises usually stay in the forest canopy and are rarely seen on the ground. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Javan slow lorises prefer to stay in the forest canopy and are rarely seen on the ground. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A member of International Animal Rescue prepares to relocate a Javan slow loris. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A member of International Animal Rescue prepares a Javan slow loris for release. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A Javan slow loris perches on a tree in the Tampomas conservation forest. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A Javan slow loris seen perched on a tree in the Tampomas conservation forest. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Two Javan slow lorises being moved to a different box during a routine check. The animals are easily stressed. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Two Javan slow lorises are relocated to a different box during a routine check. The animals are easily stressed. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
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