A worshiper cleans a statue at Toasebio Temple in Glodok, West Jakarta, on Jan. 29 in preparation for Chinese New Year. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Welcoming the Year of the Pig

BY : YUDHA BASKORO

FEBRUARY 01, 2019

Residents of Glodok in West Jakarta started to prepare for the Chinese Lunar New Year more than a week ago.

The traditional calendar dictates that this year's preparations had to commence on Jan. 28 and continue until the evening before the start of the Year of the Pig.

Residents cleaned their homes, temples, statues and prayer corners to welcome the festival. In Chinese tradition, cleaning away dust and discarding old things means getting rid of bad habits and bad luck.

Even though it usually has many twists and turns, the Year of the Pig is also marked by the arrival of wealth and fortune.

Woman worshipers are taking care of Queen Kwam Im statue in Toasebio temple, Glodok, West Jakarta on Tuesday (29/01) In Chinese, Dewi Kwan Im is a symbol of goodness, beauty and generosity for women (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Women take care of a statue of Dewi Kwan Im at Toasebio Temple in Glodok on Jan. 29. Kwan Im is a symbol of goodness, beauty and generosity for women. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A worshiper prays in Jin De Yuan temple, Glodok, West Jakarta on Tuesday (29/01) The year of pig is year full of up and down. To deal with it, everyone must pray a lot (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A woman prays at Jin De Yuan Temple in Glodok on Jan. 29 in preparation for the arrival of the Year of the Pig. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A trader starts to sell red pig printed angpau envelope in Glodok, West Java on Tuesday (29/01) This year Chinese people will celebrate the year of Pig which will be started on February 5th, 2019 (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A trader offers printed red envelopes for angpau for sale in Glodok on Jan. 29. The Lunar New Year started on Tuesday. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Workers take a rest after cleaning up the entire Jin De Yuan temple in Glodok, West Jakarta on Tuesday (29/01) They drink traditonal jamu as energy bosster (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Workers take a rest after cleaning up the entire Jin De Yuan Temple. They drink jamu, a traditional Indonesian herbal beverage, to boost their energy. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A young man wearing a lion dance costume in Glodok, West Jakarta on Tuesday (29/01) The Lion dance is called Barongsai in Indonesia. It is a symbol of power, wisdom, and good fortune, chases away evil spirits and brings hapiness, longevity, and good luck. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A young man puts on a lion dance costume. The dance is known as barongsai in Indonesia and represents power, wisdom and good fortune. It is performed to chase away evil spirits and bring happiness, longevity and good luck. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Residents who live in Jalan Kemenangan III decorate their neighborhood with red lanterns on Tuesday (29/01) The lantern, called lampion in Indonesia, is the main focus of attention of the celebration as it symbolizes the wish for a bright future. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Jalan Kemenangan III in Glodok is decorated with red lanterns ahead of Chinese New Year. The lanterns, known as lampion in Indonesia, are the focus of attention of the celebration as it symbolizes the wish for a bright future. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
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